An “Evil Eye”

G-d says to the rich man, “Not only did you fail to give of your own wealth, but also on the part that I demand be given to the poor man, you have put an ayin hara.”
As per Yitz Grossman: ┬áThe rich man’s son will not have anything which the father had. ┬áThe loss of wealth will be at a bad time.
What does G-d mean when he says that the wealthy man is giving an ayin hara to the very little that the poor man was given? Since the wealthy man does not receive satisfaction from his own wealth, he denigrates whatever little the poor man has, wishing to drag him down. His jealousy for the poor man’s tranquility prevents him from giving with a warm heart.

When our Sages say that the rich man’s wealth shall be lost at a bad time, they mean that just as the wealthy man is ready to buy something he greatly desires he will lose his wealth. This is a greater disappointment, since one sees his dreams shattered at the very moment they are about to be realized. Poor timing is part of the punishment. Not only will he suffer a depletion of wealth, but he will also lose it at the time when he most craves it.

Why does the punishment of the wealthy man include his son losing his wealth? Wealth in people’s eyes is often equated with happiness. Part of the satisfaction of being rich is that a person believes he has done everything possible to insure the happiness of his children. Hence, one of the greatest disappointments a wealthy man can feel is to be unable to help his children financially. This pains him even more than simply becoming impoverished, and so this shows the severity of his punishment for not giving.

Everyone Gains From a Mitzvah

The poor man has gained something earthly, and the rich man has gained entrance to the World to Come.
According to Yitz Grossman, even when a person enjoys considerable wealth, he is still called “an afflicted man.” The reason for this is that no matter how much wealth a person has, he is afflicted with a craving for more. Our Sages say, “He who has one hundred, wants two hundred.”(5) Therefore, he is called “afflicted,” since this describes his feelings. He is disappointed with what he has and finds himself constantly dissatisfied.

How can the verse compare the benefit reaped by the two men, as it is written, “G-d will enlighten both of them,” when it seems clear that the wealthy man has profited much more by gaining entrance to the World to Come? The poor man gains more than it appears. Firstly, he gains the material things he so desperately requires. When he has hunger pains or shivers with cold, satisfying these needs is of the utmost importance to him. Secondly, the poor man enables the wealthy one to gain entrance to the World to Come, and therefore he will receive a sizable spiritual compensation. If he had not asked for a donation, the wealthy man would not have had the opportunity to give one. Therefore, even though in human eyes it seems that the wealthy man has performed a far greater mitzvah, the Torah teaches us that those who cause the mitzvah are no less important.

Making Your Children Happy

As posted by Yitz Grossman.

During the Second World War, there was a little girl in Jerusalem who was already two and a half years old and still unable to walk. Her younger sister was showing signs of starting to walk, while she herself made no progress whatsoever. The parents were very worried and took her to the best doctors, but were unable to find a remedy. One doctor was especially pessimistic and said, “When hair grows on the palm of my hand, this little girl will walk.”

The great tzaddik, Rabbi Shlomo of Zehvil, lived in Jerusalem at that time and the girl’s mother decided to go to the rabbi and implore him to pray for the child. As it was wartime, food was very scarce, and everything was rationed. Since it was customary for one to bring a gift to a chassidic rabbi when one came to see him, the mother did the same, despite her dire situation. In the market she bought some lentils, flour, and dried fruit and brought the food to the rabbi as a present. Then she begged him to bless her daughter with a complete recovery.

The rabbi heard her story and that she was a descendant of the famous Rabbi of Brezhen. But his response was, “I would like to help you, but there is nothing I can do.”

When the mother heard this, she understood the severity of the situation, since even this great tzaddik was unable to abolish the decree in heaven against her daughter. She began to sob hysterically and did not stop imploring him to bless the child. “Yes, you can help me,” cried the mother. “A tzaddik’s prayers are always answered.”

The rabbi thought for a while and then he said to her, “There is a known method of getting your prayers answered, and that is to go to the Kosel for forty consecutive days.”

She answered, “Rebbe, how can I, a young woman with many small children, go forty days to the Kosel?” Her responsibilities to her family made it impossible for her to leave the house every day.

“But what can I do?” replied the rabbi.

“Go instead of me!” pleaded the mother.

The rabbi thought for a minute and said, “All right, I agree to go for you.” With this he sent her home with a blessing.

When she came home she told her husband about her visit to the rabbi. Exactly on the fortieth day, when the child was sitting on a chair, and her younger sister was crawling near her on the floor, she suddenly started walking normally, just like any other child. From that day on she progressed like a normal child. She later grew up, got married, and had a large family.